CVSA Focusing on Tire Safety in 2016

CVSA International Roadcheck Image

Since its inception in 1988, roadside inspections conducted during the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck have numbered more than 1.4 million.

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s 29th annual roadcheck will take place June 7-9, 2016. During this 72-hour period, approximately 10,000 CVSA-certified local, state, provincial and federal inspectors in jurisdictions across North America perform truck and bus inspections.

2016 Emphasis: Tire Safety

Each year, a special emphasis is placed on a category of violations. The special emphasis for 2016 is tire safety, and such inspections will include:

  • Measuring the tire thread depth;
  • Checking the tire pressure;
  • Checking to make sure no items are lodged between dual tires; and,
  • Examining the overall condition of the tire to ensure no deep cuts or bulges exist in the sidewalls of the tire.

According to the CVSA’s website, the top five tire violations for the 2015 calendar year were as follows:

  1. Tire – Flat and/or Audible Air Leak (36%)
  2. Flat Tire or Fabric Exposed (26%)
  3. Tire – Other Tread Depth Less Than 2/32 Of Inch (10%)
  4. Tire – Ply or Belt Material Exposed (8%)
  5. Tire – Load Weight Rating/Under Inflated (8%)

2015 CVSA Roadcheck Results

During the 2015 roadcheck, the CVSA inspectors completed 69,472 truck and bus inspections, and 777 seat belt violations were issued. Of the 69,472 total inspections, 44,989 were North American Standard Level I Inspections, which is the most thorough roadside inspection.

The statistics for those 44,989 were as follows:

  • 1,623 (3.6%) of drivers had out-of-service violations
  • 9,732 (21.6%) of vehicles had out-of-service violations

The 2015 special emphasis was load securement. During the roadcheck, inspectors issued 2,439 violations for load securement. The leading load securement violations, by number of violations issued, were:

  1. Failure to prevent shifting/loss of load
  2. Failure to secure truck equipment (tarps, dunnage, doors, tailgates, spare tires)
  3. Damaged tie downs (typically unacceptable wear on chain or cuts and tears on web straps)
  4. Insufficient tie downs
  5. Loose tie downs

At Truck Writers, we assist our clients with safety and compliance initiatives. If you would like to discuss your policies and procedures with an agent, or request a free trucking insurance quote, contact us today!

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